EatPlayLove Cafe

The whole family visited EatPlayLove Cafe recently and spent an enjoyable two hours having dinner and playing with polyshrink. We bought just two sheets of polyshrink (they sell for $5 a sheet) and made well over 20 little shrinky dinks. Good fun!

image

The interior of EatPlayLove Cafe. Crafting materials everywhere!

image

Colourful walls to inspire creativity.

image

Sock monkeys! Alison bought the kit to make one in brown.

I think EatPLayLove Cafe has a magic formula – provide a safe place for kids to do all kinds of crafts, and decent food at very affordable prices, in a warm and welcoming environment. This was my second visit – we only tried the banana chocolate waffle and the lychee grass jelly then – so this was my first time trying the mains.

image

I had the green curry with chicken. It came with a fried egg and a bowlful of rice and tasted much like any other green curry. The bowl seemed small at first but I was full when I finished.

image

K’s chicken chop with pasta, with added prawns for $5.

image

Grass jelly with lychee and nata de coco.

image

Mango pudding.

image

I think this was coconut delight.

The shrinky dink-making continued throughout dinner, with all of us making multiple trips to the oven to shrink our drawings.

image

My Little Ponies, about to be baked.

image

Guess who!

If I recall, our bill for seven mains and five desserts (and two sheets of polyshrink) came to just under $100. Not bad for fun for the whole family.

EatPlayLove Cafe
28 Aliwal Street #01-07 Singapore 199918
Tel: 6444 6400
Reservations highly recommended

Anniversary dinner at Brotzeit

K and I celebrated our 14th anniversary last week at Brotzeit. We’d originally hoped to have dinner at Werner’s Oven in Joo Chiat, then watch The Lunchbox at a nearby cinema, but as K could only get tickets for the movie at VivoCity, we decided to walk around there until we could decide what we’d like to have for dinner. After strolling up and down the restaurant row on the first floor of the mall, we decided on Brotzeit as K was in the mood for meat.

image

We ordered a regular-sized seafood salad to share. It was lovely, with super-fresh and succulent prawns, smoked salmon and tuna slices.

image

The onion soup was good – not too salty, and I loved the cheese dumpling.

image

We had a platter of pork sausages too.

Although K and I shared all the food plus a glass of alcohol-free German beer (yes we’re wusses) we were very stuffed after polishing off everything. We’d entertained thoughts of having dessert at Fruit Paradise at first, but weren’t able to manage it. I really liked the salad, and will definitely order it next time I’m at Brotzeit, as an alternative to all that red meat.

Brotzeit is at VivoCity, Raffles City, Orchard 313 and at 126 East Coast Road (opposite 112 Katong).

Rising Son

The whole family caught Rising Son last night at the DBS Arts Centre. It gave the girls a glimpse into what life was like during World War 2 – a period in Singapore’s history which for them exists only in history textbooks and documentaries. I think it’s important for young people to understand what things were like for their grandparents and great-grandparents who were teenagers and young adults during the time of the war. It contextualises how fortunate we are by comparison.

Rising Son is based on playwright Dick Lee’s father’s experiences during the war, memorialised in diaries and elaborated in long conversations between father and son. It presents a perspective on World War 2 that is slightly controversial – the unlikely friendship between siblings Sunny and Ruby, and Colonel Sato, their next-door neighbour who is uncommonly kind and friendly for a Japanese soldier. The play is both a coming of age story and a commentary on occupation – Sunny’s focus is on surviving the war, Sato’s mind is constantly filled with thoughts of a gentler time even as he carries out his duties as a judge in the Japanese army, and Ruby rebels against her physical confinement by taking risks.

Here’s the making-of video:

The play is Dick Lee’s first foray into writing drama and is an admirable effort, though a little unwieldy in some places. It’s a very simple play, but with many layers and opportunities for individual interpretation. It definitely had elements of Lee’s signature style – moments of humour, and of course some singing. If you like Dick Lee’s productions, you’ll like Rising Son.

Rising Son is on till 12 April. Book through Sistic.